Our Next Big Adventure

Well, my wife Diane and I have always dreamed of moving to New Zealand when we retire. However, we are moving our timeline up a little and moving to New Zealand in the next couple of months. Diane lived in New Zealand for 22 years before coming to America and meeting me. We have talked often about returning to New Zealand after we both retire.  

No, I am not retiring yet. But we do want to take the next step in our adventure. I have been working in my clinic for over 27 years now and teaching live manual therapy courses for the past 9 years.   My teaching has transferred to virtual classes with the corona virus limiting the number of people that can meet live at one time.  I have also been doing telehealth virtual treatments with my patients that can’t come into the clinic right now. I will continue to treat my patients in the US virtually from New Zealand.  I am still seeing patients live at the clinic until we move. 

New Zealand Traffic Jam

Diane is a New Zealand citizen.  And New Zealand has done a great job of keeping the virus under control.  In doing so they are very strict with who can come into the country and when.  I inquired if I would be allowed to move to New Zealand with Diane since she is a NZ citizen.  The immigration office gave me special travel permission on the basis that we are in the country by November 5, 2020!  That was a lot faster than we planned. But we have decided to take this opportunity, so when we do retire we are already settled in New Zealand.  But I don’t see myself ever fully retiring. I love what I do too much!

I will continue to teach virtually and conduct live classes when they allow people to meet in larger numbers again. But my new live courses will be focused in New Zealand, Australia, Singapore and Japan.  I hope to come back to the US to teach while visiting friends and family. 

I will be setting up a clinic in New Zealand to help the population down under with my skills.  But I plan on continuing to do virtual treatments with my US-based patients.  I am amazed at how effective it is to help patients online.  I can use video calls to assess and treat patients using exercises and coaching to solve many problems.  We all have to adapt to these new times. I will help in any way I can before we leave.

Can My Back Pain Be Coming From My Hips?

Back pain can be caused by many different factors. Most people when they have pain think that the cause of the pain is the worst possible scenario. Your mind defaults to the worst possible reason for the pain.  Funny how our mind plays tricks on us.

Let’s look at some of the reasons for back pain and what you can do to help yourself.  If you have an injury, several things can become stressed in your back.  A fall or car accident can cause damage to your bones, disc, fascia, nerves, or muscles. These injuries are related to a direct trauma to your back. This type of injury is actually easy to fix because we know the mechanism of injury. We can easily evaluate the components of your back and determine if the cause of the pain is disc, bone, or muscle.

The more difficult type of back pain to evaluate and treat is pain that starts with no mechanism of injury.  This type of pain requires your therapist to be one part manual therapist and one part detective. You and your therapist have to look at all the clues to determine, “Who Done It?”  

One of the first places to look for the cause of your back pain is your posture. In manual therapy we use a rule that “form and function are reciprocally related.” This means that your posture or form can directly affect your back function. If your posture is within a proper normal alignment then your back muscles and joints won’t be overtaxed. But if your form or posture is not optimal then you are putting stress and strain on the structure of your back. This will lead to abnormal wear and tear that can result in pain and spasms. 

Many times your hips are not in ideal alignment and that puts stress on your low back muscles. This misalignment leads to overuse of these muscles. The muscles will eventually give up and cause pain to make you aware that something is wrong.

Watch this video to assess if your hips are properly aligned and how to correct any misalignment.

When Mom said, “Stand up straight,” I bet she didn’t realize posture wasn’t just for looking good, but for feeling good too!

What About the Mind, Body, Spirit Connection?

In last month’s blog I introduced you to my new blog topic, “The Owner’s Manual to Your Body.” When we are born we don’t come with an owner’s manual for our bodies. Which is strange, because when we buy a new car or refrigerator they come with owner’s manuals on how to take care of them!

I have done over 30,000 treatments with patients over the years as a manual therapist. One of the biggest takeaways is that most people don’t pay attention to their body or understand how it works. They wait until something is broken and are having major issues before they take notice. But, by then, it may be too late and the damage is already done.

So early on in my career I developed a philosophy of helping people through education, manual therapy, and self-responsibility. I’m a big believer that if you understand how your body works, you can take better responsibility for its maintenance and care. 

When I see new patients in my office who are suffering from pain, they usually fall into two categories:

  1. The pain is caused by a trauma or injury
  2. It’s an insidious onset, meaning they don’t know what started it or how it happened.

Let’s talk about this second group. It will give you an insight into the Mind Body Spirit connection. 

Western medicine tends to use a Cartesian model in treating the human body. This means that they break the body down into individual pieces, parts, or systems and don’t always look at the interconnections between the different systems. An orthopedic doctor only looks at the bones as being an issue with the person’s pain. There have been many times when patients come in to see me after getting an X-ray and the doctor says there’s nothing wrong with them, because nothing showed up on the X-ray. My nearly three decades of having a manual therapy practice has taught me that you can’t look at a single system of the body in isolation.

The body is more complex than its’ individual pieces and must be understood from a holistic model.  The body is a dynamic unit of function. Everything is interconnected. That means we need to consider the body from a mind, body, and spirit perspective.  

I want to use a few examples so you understand my point about the mind- Body Connection. Have you ever heard someone say…

  • You carry the weight of the world on your shoulders.
  • I get so nervous I get butterflies in my stomach.
  • He’s a pain in my butt.

What these common sayings tell us is that how we think has a direct effect on our physical body. It’s a way of saying that our mind and body are connected. There is a physiological response to our psychological State of Mind. 

For example, muscles represent our ability to move in life. So, if you’re having problems with the muscles in your legs, ask yourself, “What resistance do you have to moving forward or being open to new experiences? 

Cramping can represent holding on too tight, gripping, tension, or fear. So if cramping is an issue for you, ask yourself, “What are you holding onto too tightly psychologically?” That may be having a physiological effect on your legs.

From a physiological standpoint try stretching your calves to minimize the tension. Watch this video https://www.soarpointmassage.com/blog-and-videos for a simple and effective ways of loosening up the muscles in your calf without stretching.

What is Your Focus During Shelter in Place? Changing Focus While Sheltering in Place

I hope you are doing well despite the challenges present in the world today. Life has changed in ways I have never seen in my 56 years on this earth. I know for some of you it may be a little longer or shorter. But I can say, our efforts to stay safe are unprecedented in the history of the United States and the world. We have all had to make big changes to our lifestyle, family, work, money, daily activities and habits.

One thing I know is, “Change is constant.” But the question is, “Is the change positive or negative? Are you making progress or going backwards? You can’t fight change. But you can ride the wave and not be deluged by it. So embrace change and know you can always adjust your focus.

While staying home, I have been contemplating how I can continue to help the patients who cannot come into the clinic. So, I went back to my mission statement that states, “I help people heal through education, manual therapy, and self-responsibility”. I have shifted my focus, since I can’t do hands-on manual treatments at present andI am focusing on the educational and self-responsibility aspects.

I have been in practice for 27 years helping people solve their pain issues. In all the years I have been practicing, I have treated a great variety of aches, pains, traumas, both acute and chronic. By using my 3 guiding principles I have been able to help so many of my patients get back to living a life that is richer and more fulfilling for them.

My new focus will be on the educational and self-responsibility components of my mission. So my new ‘blog post’ theme going forward will be “The Owner’s Manual for Your Body”.

Lymphatic System Part 3 COVID-19 edition

I want to start by saying I hope you are healthy and safe during this unprecedented time. We are all learning to do things differently these days.

Back to our discussion of the Lymphatic system, we covered the following topics in prior blog posts:

  • Defense
  • Cleaning of the tissues
  • Fluid balance

Let’s talk about the last 2 important functions:

  • Transportation
  • and Nutrition

Then we will discuss how your lymphatic system will protect you and repair damage from a virus or bacteria.

Remember the blood is brought to the capillaries from the heart, via the arteries. At the capillary level fluid leaks out, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells, organs and tissues of the body. The majority of the fluid returns to the heart via the venous system. The Lymphatic system picks up the cellular waste, excess water, proteins, carbon dioxide, antigens, chemical mediators, and other hydrocolloids and transports them to the lymph nodes for processing and cleaning before transporting the clean fluid back to the heart. The transportation of this excess fluid is important to regulate fluid balance.

After an injury or surgery often there can be swelling and edema.  It is the lymphatic systems job to transport this excess fluid away from the injury or surgical site after the tissues begin to heal.  This should happen naturally on its own.  But if your lymphatic system is damaged or compromised, it may need help from a manual therapist using proper techniques like lymphatic massage or taping to promote proper lymphatic drainage.

Lastly the lymphatic system plays a role in our nutrition. Remember the lymph carries water, the large protein molecules and absorbs fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins from the digestive system and transports them into the bloodstream.

In this COVID-19 environment, it is more important than ever to keep your lymphatic system functioning at full potential.  The lymphatic system plays a critical role in your immune system defense.   With a healthy immune and Lymphatic system you will be able to protect your body from bacteria and viruses.  That is the main roll of your immune system…to protect you.

With this time of sheltering we tend to be more sedentary. Your lymphatic system depends on muscle contraction to help move your lymph.  The more you sit, the less your lymph moves. So get up and move! Movement of fluid is essential to good health.

Watch my video on how to improve your lymphatic function.

Cleanse and Maintain: Your Lymphatic System – Part 2

In our last Blog post we discussed the important roles of the lymphatic system and its role in the immune system and defense of your body.  The next 2 roles of your lymphatic system are to cleanse the tissues and maintain the fluid balance. The lymphatic system is best known for its work to clean the tissues. Many times you will hear the lymph system referred to as the “sewer system” of your body.

The fluid that leaves the capillaries and delivers oxygen and nutrients to the cells and tissues of our body also picks up waste products from the tissues. If this fluid contains large protein molecules or is too toxic to be brought back into general circulation, it is picked up by the lymphatic capillaries. The lymphatic system then delivers this “dirty” fluid to the lymph nodes. The lymph nodes are the “washing machine” of the lymphatic system.  The fluid that contains waste products is cleaned of toxins and proteins by the lymph nodes.

The lymph nodes have lymphocytes that cleanup the bacteria, viruses, and debris. These nodes concentrate the fluid and send the purified fluid back into general circulation and dispose of the toxic substances. The fluid must be clear and safe before it goes back to the heart. Once the fluid is cleaned, the Lymphatic System returns the fluid into use so that the fluid levels stay balanced. Over the course of a day, 30 liters of fluids are exchanged between the capillaries and the tissues.  Typically, 27 liters come back in safely without needing to be cleaned. That leaves 3 liters of “dirty” fluid that needs cleaning. Once cleaned, the 3 liters of fluid are returned into circulation by the lymph system to keep the blood pressure regulated and its job is done. 

Why is Your Lymphatic System So Important?

Do you know what your lymphatic system does? Or the role it plays in keeping you healthy?  When I ask my patients if they know anything about their lymphatic system, they typically say they know they have one but don’t know what’s it for or how it works. 

Your lymphatic system is sometimes called your second circulatory system. Your first circulatory system is the heart, arteries, veins and capillaries. This system transports the blood throughout your body.  The lymphatic system has a series of vessels and nodes that transport the lymph throughout the body.

There are 5 main functions that the lymph system performs. 

  • Defense
  • Cleaning of the tissues
  • Fluid balance
  • Transportation
  • Nutrition

Let’s just talk about the first function – Defense.

Approximately 70% of your superficial lymph system is just under the surface of your skin.  This acts as a barrier to external toxins, bacteria, and viruses trying to enter your system.  If toxic substances get through the skin, the lymphatic system is the first system to attack the invaders.

The lymph system carries lymphocytes that are part of the immune system. These lymphocytes, white blood cells, T Cells, and B cells help protect our bodies by attracting and destroying foreign invaders.

It is important to keep our lymphatic system strong and healthy. This will help protect you from colds, flues and viruses. Lymphatic Balancing is a great manual therapy technique that can keep your immune system strong and healthy.

How Does Your Body Heal After Knee Replacement?

As we age we all will experience aches and pains…sometimes minor, sometimes major.. We can actually wear out parts of our body from years of wear and tear. If that happens and the damage is too severe, you may need to replace a knee or hip joint. Ultimately, you want to take care of your body to prevent needing joint replacements. But, unfortunately, the body doesn’t come with an owner’s manual that tells us when to change our oil or tune-up our engines.

If you do need to get a knee replaced, there is a sequence that the body goes through to heal.  One of the first reactions to the trauma of having a knee replaced is swelling. Swelling is a normal reaction post-surgery.  But swelling can prevent healing if it persists. 


In the rehab phase of a total knee replacement, reducing the swelling is one of the first stages.  In order for the knee to heal it needs fresh blood bringing new nutrients and oxygen to the area.  So the swelling needs to be reduced to allow for fresh blood to bring in the good stuff. If your knee is swollen and stagnant, there is no room for more fresh blood to get into the knee.

Using Kinesiotape is one way to improve the lymphatic drainage of a knee. The tape has a slight stretch that promotes lymphatic drainage when applied correctly.  This will enhance the body’s natural processes of reducing the swelling.  Once that occurs the healing can continue.

As we age we all will experience aches and pains…sometimes minor, sometimes major.. We can actually wear out parts of our body from years of wear and tear. If that happens and the damage is too severe, you may need to replace a knee or hip joint. Ultimately, you want to take care of your body to prevent needing joint replacements. But, unfortunately, the body doesn’t come with an owner’s manual that tells us when to change our oil or tune-up our engines.

If you do need to get a knee replaced, there is a sequence that the body goes through to heal.  One of the first reactions to the trauma of having a knee replaced is swelling. Swelling is a normal reaction post-surgery.  But swelling can prevent healing if it persists. 


In the rehab phase of a total knee replacement, reducing the swelling is one of the first stages.  In order for the knee to heal it needs fresh blood bringing new nutrients and oxygen to the area.  So the swelling needs to be reduced to allow for fresh blood to bring in the good stuff. If your knee is swollen and stagnant, there is no room for more fresh blood to get into the knee.

Using Kinesiotape is one way to improve the lymphatic drainage of a knee. The tape has a slight stretch that promotes lymphatic drainage when applied correctly.  This will enhance the body’s natural processes of reducing the swelling.  Once that occurs the healing can continue.

Watch this slideshow on how to tape a knee to reduce the swelling and bruising after having total knee replacement surgery.

Thanksgiving: Time to Count Your Blessings?

This is a good time of year to reflect and count our blessings from the past year. Thanksgiving is in a few weeks,  a time for friends and families to share a meal and celebrate the holiday season.  We are lucky to live in this great country and to have the opportunities we do.  This year I have had the privilege to teach manual therapy courses and travel both around the country and internationally.  When you get out of your home environment you can compare other regions of the world to what you have at home.  Even if it is going to the next town or across the state, there are differences, both good and bad. 

It’s all about your perspective.  Our perspective shapes our thoughts and feelings about things.  Those of us used to living in the United States take a lot of things for granted based on our perspective and experiences.  For instance, it costs about $35 to fill up the gas tank in my car here in Sarasota. When I was traveling in New Zealand this year, it cost $70-$80 to fill  my rental that had a smaller gas tank than my car at home!  So when we think gas prices are high here in the states, it’s all relative.

I had the great fortune to teach two courses in Canada this year. I am grateful they have such a good educational system for the therapists in Canada. It made teaching advanced work much easier because of the skill sets of the therapists taking my classes.  Teaching in the U.S. is different because each state has different standards and educational requirements. Yet, when I was in the Cook Islands, the therapists didn’t even have educational requirements. It’s all about your perspective.

So I can say I am truly grateful and blessed to live in this country and have the opportunity to teach around the world.  I love my manual therapy practice in Sarasota, Florida and grateful for the patients who honor me by trusting their healthcare to me. I am also grateful for my wife, family, and friends.  These are just a few of the things I am grateful for. 

What are you grateful for?

Hurricane Safety Tips For Your Back

Yes, we are in the middle of yet another hurricane season.  It is important to prepare for rain, high winds, and possible flooding when a storm is approaching your area.  But you also need to take care of your body and back when preparing for storms.  I see a lot of patients this time of year due to back spasms and strains from lifting and carrying heavy objects in preparation for storms. 

Here are some does and don’ts when preparing for the next big storm.

Give yourself plenty of time to prepare.  If you do a little each day to get ready, you are less likely to over exert yourself with your preparations. Take your time and do a little over several days, instead of trying to get everything ready in a few short hours.  This will be less strenuous on your back.  We get at least a week’s notice if a storm is heading our way. Use that time wisely.

Ask for help. Remember you don’t need to do everything by yourself.  If you need things moved or storm shutters put up, ask a friend or neighbor to help you. During emergencies people are more willing to help out, but you need to ask.  It will make them feel good knowing they helped out a friend or neighbor in need. So don’t be embarrassed to ask for help.

Now for the don’ts.

Don’t lift objects that you normally would not if a storm was not coming.  I ask my patients how they hurt their back and they tell me all the things they did to prepare for the storm.  They lift and carry things they normally would not try to lift if a storm was not coming. Watch this video to see why your back gets hurt from lifting things that are too heavy.   Just because a storm is coming it doesn’t give you superhero strength. 

Don’t be inundated by the news and weather reports.  Yes you need to stay informed but you don’t need to be obsessive with watching the news.  The stress of news can make your whole body tighten up. Your psychological state of mind has a physiological reaction in your body. That reaction to emotional stress is tighter muscles.  So when you are stressed form watching too much news you are more likely to hurt your back because you are starting out with tight muscles before you do an activity.